FilmHorrorReviews

The Ingress Tapes (2017, UK) Review

The Ingress Tapes (2017, UK) Review

‘There’s a few things I’d like to get off my mind before I go’ confesses the deep voice of an unseen man with a South London accent. Before us is a desk with three objects laid out on its surface; a reel to reel tape recorder, a telephone and an ashtray. In The Ingress Tapes we will hear the detailed and confessional musings of an unidentified criminal but intriguingly neither they nor their interviewer are ever identified, a detail which adds to the film’s overall atmosphere of ambiguity. It would appear that the tapes are first-hand accounts of a catalogue of brutal and shocking crimes.

“Fantasy, confession or evidence?”

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Clickbait (2019, USA) Review

Clickbait (2019, USA) Review

The Oxford online dictionary defines Clickbait as: ‘material put on the internet in order to attract attention and encourage visitors to click on a link to a particular web page’. The 2019 film directed by Sophia Cacciola and Michael J. Epstein of the same name is probably best defined as a comedy peppered with elements of horror; a parable that serves to warn us against the dangers of the dark web. The premise is clear enough- college student Bailey has been topping the ranks on a social media platform called Streaker with her video uploads.

“You only die once. Make sure it’s live!”

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The Church (2018, USA) Review

The Church (2018, USA) Review

The Corinth Baptist Church has hit some troubling times, its congregation is diminishing and funds in the collection box are low. However, this is the least of its problems. For Pastor James, the future of his family legacy is looking grim. This is The Church, directed by Dom Frank whose principal setting also happens to be the place of worship that his own family have attended for decades. Although pressured to sell the church for reasons ranging from reaching the community to big screens that will deliver the message of God to 2,000 people, Pastor James appears to have reservations.

“Vengeance is His.”

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There’s No Place Like Home: Class, Conflict and Violence in Ils (2006) Part 3: Violence and the Victim

There’s No Place Like Home: Class, Conflict and Violence in Ils (2006)

The most gratuitous violence we witness is at the hands of those positioned in the role of victim. Clem leaves Lucas to look for a way out and is chased by one of the assailants through an unfinished room containing a number of hanging plastic sheets, another metaphor for the social divisions and obstacles that exist between the couple and the youngsters. This culminates in her being pursued through an attic space; so far, no physical violence has been directed from the youngsters towards the couple.

“They wouldn’t play with us…”

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There’s No Place Like Home: Class, Conflict and Violence in Ils (2006) Part 2: The House As A Safe Place

There’s No Place Like Home: Class, Conflict and Violence in Ils (2006)

For Clem and Lucas, their house represents not only their success and status in society but it functions as a place where they can relax and feel assured that they are protected. The home they have chosen reveals a lot about how they perceive themselves and perhaps most importantly, how they’d like to be perceived by others. Originating from France, a country widely known for upholding its values and traditions, it’s telling that their house is the embodiment of these things. Grand and spacious, it reflects the opulence of eighteenth-century France with its vast corridors and period detail.

“This can’t be happening…”

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There’s No Place Like Home: Class, Conflict and Violence in Ils (2006) Part 1: The Outsider Moving In

There’s No Place Like Home: Class, Conflict and Violence in Ils (2006)

Stradling the sub genres of the new French extremity, home invasion and the controversial, oftentimes topical subject of the young and alienated working classes, Ils offers up a set of complex questions that are juxtaposed with its very simple and fast paced framework. We can all recall a time when we have been alone in our homes at night and felt under threat for some reason, even if that threat transpires to be nothing more than a creaking door or a loose floor board…

“You’ll never feel safe in your home again.”

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