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THE EVIL DEAD/EVIL DEAD 2, HOUSE/HOUSE II: THE SECOND STORY & THE WARRIORS Merchandise from Fright-Rags

THE EVIL DEAD/EVIL DEAD 2, HOUSE/HOUSE II: THE SECOND STORY & THE WARRIORS Merchandise from Fright-Rags

Whether you prefer Sam Raimi’s 1981 indie horror landmark or his black humor-injected 1987 sequel, Fright-Rags returns to the cabin in the woods with new The Evil Dead/Evil Dead 2 merchandise.

You are also cordially invited to spend an evening with Fright-Rags, Roger Cobb and his friends. Four t-shirts have been created for House and House II: The Second Story. Don’t forget to come out to play with The Warriors apparel. Can you dig it?

“Horror has also found a new home.”

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Evil Ed (1995, Sweden) Review

Evil Ed (1995)

Remember the days when films were captured on, well, film? You don’t? Whippersnapper. Respectable and reserved editor Eddie Swenson does. So when he’s transferred from his quiet, restrained art house section, to the brash, blood soaked vistas of the splatter and gore department, he realises why watching hours and hours of video violence may cause one to lose their head. You see, his predecessor went out with an, errrm…bang, after chowing down on a hand grenade. So Ed’s boss Samuel Campbell ‘promotes’ him to a domain that produces the ‘Loose Limbs’ series.

“It’s a no brainer.”

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I’d buy that for a dollar! Celebrate 30 Years of ROBOCOP and EVIL DEAD 2 with Fright-Rags Apparel

Fright-Rags' RoboCop and Evil Dead 2 Collections

Fright-Rags are celebrating the 30th anniversaries of both Paul Verhoeven’s RoboCop and Sam Raimi’s Evil Dead 2, with new merchandise dedicated to these 80s cult classics.

“Part man. Part machine. All cop. The future of law enforcement.”

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5 Quintessential Splatter Films

Braindead (1992)

Explicit gore was beginning to infiltrate the grindhouses of America, and ensured that employees of the British Board of Film Censors were working hard for their salaries. Strong reactions from the public, fuelled by politicians, tabloids and critics, set in motion outrage that would result in many splatter films being outright banned; especially in the United Kingdom.

“I created what no man’s mind nor woman’s womb could ever hope to achieve.”

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