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Mohawk (2017, USA) Review

Mohawk (2017)

Back in 2015, Ted Geoghegan released his directorial debut We Are Still Here and took a lot of people by surprise, including myself. A well-crafted horror that didn’t follow the same old cliches that a lot of horrors do today. His follow up, Mohawk, is kind of following the same route. Not so much a horror this time, but a film that depicts plenty of horrors and a complete diversion from his previous movie. The tale follows the events of 1812 where war is boiling over between the Americans and the British. Sandwiched in between is the Mohawk tribe who reluctantly refuse to take sides or fight.

“They’re gonna kill us all if we don’t fight.”

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The Nightingale (2018, Australia) Sundance London 2019 Review

The Nightingale (2018)

The Nightingale follows Clare, an Irish convict who is regularly abused by vile British officer Hawkins, eventually resulting in her husband and new-born infant being murdered in front of her while she is being gang raped in an excruciatingly long and graphic scene. When Hawkins abandons his post due to the drunkenness of his men and journeys up north to apply for another post, Clare sets out to exact her own revenge. She brings along a native guide named Billy, who she treats unfairly. Billy is the only character who prevents this film from being a period based I Spit on Your Grave

“Her song will not be silenced.”

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Karate Kill (2016, Japan / USA) Review

Karate Kill (2016)

Japanese wannabe actress Mayumi is abducted by an absolute nut-job called Vendenski and his hysterically seedy cult – Capital Messiah. They’re feared throughout the criminal community for reasons that are beyond me, but nobody seems to be able to touch them, until Mayumi’s brother, Kenji, travels over in search of his missing sister. Oh yeah, I forgot to mention Kenji is a Karate Master, wouldn’t you just know it? This now sets the wheels in motion for Kenji to stroll around L.A. all brooding and a fish out of water, but cracking skulls as he’s doing it.

“He is no Mr. Miyagi.”

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John Wick (2014, USA) Review

John Wick (2014)

I’m not a fan of action films. You know the ones, purely ‘Action’. I hate car chases. DESPISE ‘em! I hate things exploding left, right and centre. I hate overly-long gunfights. They annoy me and make me all fidgety. John Wick is an action/thriller, directed by two stunt men and stars Keanu Reeves. “WHY ARE YOU WATCHING THIS, YOU FUCKING MASOCHIST?!!” I hear you shout, and you’d be right to ask. I dunno. But I’m SO glad that I did! John Wick is an ex-hitman, grieving for his recently deceased wife. When the son of a mob boss takes a liking to Wick’s car and decides to take it, bad things happen.

“Revenge is all he has left.”

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You Were Never Really Here (2017, UK / France / USA)

You Were Never Really Here (2017)

In You Were Never Really Here, Lynne Ramsay explores the themes of abuse, violence, trauma and the corruption inherent in the powerful elite. She has re-fashioned the narrative and plot without diminishing its brutal impact, and elevated what might have been a conventional revenge flick by sheer filmmaking skill. The action of the film accelerates and ultimately concludes without necessarily developing in the conventional way. In You Were Never Really Here, Ramsay has managed to translate her singular vision into a complex, but compelling, feature film.

“I want you to hurt them.”

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8 Horrifying Films from Grimmfest 2017 (Saturday 7th October)

Grimmfest Saturday 7th October 2017

Grimmfest, screening the best in fantastic film, took place at Vue Printworks, Manchester, UK between 5th-8th October 2017. Overall this was a brilliant event where I enjoyed all but one film and even that was only a short, so it wasn’t too bad.

“Grimm up North.”

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I Saw the Devil (2010, South Korea)

I Saw the Devil (2010)

The South Korean film industry has enjoyed a twenty year renaissance especially in the thriller/horror/gore genres. The release of Oldboy (2003) put South Korean cinema back on the map, after seeing its once glorious traditions wane for many years. I Saw the Devil is the penultimate representative of this new style of Korean cinema, with acting, cinematography, direction and production values equal to any of the world’s leading movie centers.

“Don’t act so weak… this is just the beginning. Remember… your nightmare’s only getting worse!”

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Grave Tales by Craig Jex

Grave Tales by Craig Jex

Grave Tales is a collection of eight short stories by Craig Jex, writer of the exploitative, EC Comic styled Brutal Bombshells. Written over a period of twelve years each short story is drenched in sticky crimson red, bookended with two highly exploitative tales of terror.

Grave Tales may be a short read at only 69 pages, but it is one collection that will grab you by the throat and won’t let go until your eyes burst from their sockets!

“Thank God for a quick funeral…he had never done anything like this before, even with a live member of the opposite sex.”

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5 Must-See Modern Korean Horror Movies

A Tale of Two Sisters (2003)A Tale of Two Sisters (2003): From its eerie opening credits – indistinct ripples ebbing over green wallpaper – to the plot twists and revelations at its climax, ‘A Tale of Two Sisters’ is worthy of admission to the ranks of the best psychological horrors with greats such as ‘The Innocents’ or ‘The Others’.

“Do you know what’s really scary? You want to forget something. Totally wipe it off your mind. But you never can. It can’t go away, you see. And it follows you around like a ghost.”

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Dark Cinema: Horror from Japan and Korea

Ju-on: The Grudge (2002)

When a new era of Asian horror films entered mainstream Western cinema with Hideo Nakata’s ‘The Ring’, Asian horror movies were soon perceived to be chasing Hollywood’s more hackneyed horror efforts into the shadows.

“This kind of thing… it doesn’t start by one person telling a story. It’s more like everyone’s fear just takes on a life of its own.”

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