ComedyDramaFilmReviews

Under the Tree (2017, Iceland)

Under the Tree (Undir trénu) (2017)

There’s an old saying about how you can choose your friends but you can’t choose your family. You also can’t generally choose your neighbors, and sometimes they can be even harder to avoid than family. It can be a real risk to try to befriend a neighbor, because if it all goes wrong somehow your only option is to pack up and move, and that’s a hassle nobody wants. Still, in Under the Tree, both sets of neighbors would have been much better off if they’d fled to opposite sides of the country. Admittedly Iceland isn’t a very big country, but that might have worked.

“Two families. One tree. A bloody mess.”

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American Animals (2018, UK / USA)

American Animals (2018, UK / USA)

At the outset of American Animals the words “This is not based on a true story,” appear onscreen, then three of those words disappear leaving the statement – “This is a true story.” Although American Animals is a heist film at its core, British documentarian Bart Layton, in an impressive feature debut, relies closely on a factual account of real events which took place in 2004. Intercut with the dramatization of the robbery played by actors, are interviews with the actual men who committed the crimes. This makes for an interesting and unusual combination of documentary and dramatic fiction.

“The perfect heist is a work of fiction.”

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Assault (1971, UK) Network Blu-ray Review

Assault (1971, UK) Network Blu-ray Review

Adapted from Kendal Young’s 1964 novel The Ravine, Sidney Hayers’ Assault is a vicious psychological thriller. Tessa Hurst, a 16-year-old pupil of the Heatherdene School for Girls in London, decides to take a shortcut home through the woods – through an area known as the Devil’s End. Unbeknownst to Tessa, she is being stalked by an unseen assailant who, upon making himself known, proceeds to chase her as she flees in terror. With nowhere to run Tessa is assaulted, partially stripped, and raped.

“If you go down in the woods today…”

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FRIGHTMARE (Slasher Classics Collection) on Blu-ray 10th September from 88 Films

FRIGHTMARE (Slasher Classics Collection) on Blu-ray 10th September from 88 Films

Also known as The Horror Star, the 1983 cult creeper Frightmare offered audiences postmodern shocks long before Wes Craven gave us his game-changing Scream in 1996! An underrated and underseen gem, Frightmare tells of a celebration for a late, great horror star… only the actor in question might not be entirely dead and soon the participants at his supposed party are being picked off one by one!

“His encore performance was murder!”

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John Wick (2014, USA)

John Wick (2014)

I’m not a fan of action films. You know the ones, purely ‘Action’. I hate car chases. DESPISE ‘em! I hate things exploding left, right and centre. I hate overly-long gunfights. They annoy me and make me all fidgety. John Wick is an action/thriller, directed by two stunt men and stars Keanu Reeves. “WHY ARE YOU WATCHING THIS, YOU FUCKING MASOCHIST?!!” I hear you shout, and you’d be right to ask. I dunno. But I’m SO glad that I did! John Wick is an ex-hitman, grieving for his recently deceased wife. When the son of a mob boss takes a liking to Wick’s car and decides to take it, bad things happen.

“Revenge is all he has left.”

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Heathers (1988, USA)

Heathers (1988)

As a British kid who had little interest in American High School movies, I was shown the original 1988 film Heathers by an American friend and was much surprised and amused by the sly subversiveness of its pitch-black satire. It offered the conventional ‘Mean Girls’ social dynamics, but offset that with extremes of murder and suicide.

Made a decade before the tragic shootings at Columbine high school, Heathers is a film that appears more controversial now than it was at the time that it was made.

“Best friends, social trends and occasional murder.”

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Hereditary (2018, USA)

Hereditary (2018)

There isn’t much I haven’t already seen when it comes to horror films. I’ve been watching them ever since I was old enough to get away with it, or even before (on one occasion I got in to see The Exorcist while underage because I was accompanied by a priest!). I’ve seen all the regular horror tropes play out in scores of films, with varying degrees of success.

Although the overriding premise of Ari Aster’s first feature, Hereditary, isn’t a particularly original one, the unfolding and execution of that premise is exceptional.

“Every family tree hides a secret.”

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The Vault (2017, USA)

The Vault (2017)

Writer/director Dan Bush says of his film, The Vault, that his vision was to make a movie where ‘Heist meets horror’. He couches this ambition in a story dealing with sibling loyalty and conflict.

When Michael Dillon gets into trouble with a vicious gangster, he has to come up with a great deal of money very quickly in order to save his life. His two estranged sisters, Leah an ex-con, and Vee who has spent time in the military, come up with a plan to recruit some heavies who will help them rob a nearby bank.

“No one is safe.”

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Ring (1998, Japan)

Ring (1998)

Adapted from Koji Suzuki’s 1991 novel of the same name, Ringu リング is a cultural phenomena. Directed by Hideo Nakata, Ring launched a revival of horror filmmaking in Japan, and influenced American horror cinema at the turn of the 21st century. From the moment the Toho vanity card ends, Ringu gets under your skin. Forgoing the science behind the videotape in Koji Suzuki’s original novel, Hideo Nakata and screenwriter Hiroshi Takahashi instead re-imagine Ringu as a curse.

“So that video is… It’s not of this world. It’s Sadako’s fury. And she’s put a curse on us.”

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Indicator July 2018 Blu-ray Titles

Indicator July 2018 Blu-ray Titles

This July, Indicator presents a chilling selection of classic British genre cinema, all packaged in lovingly produced Limited Editions, including Blu-ray premieres and extensive collector’s booklets. On 23 July, Indicator presents Hammer Volume Three: Blood & Terror, the next volume in its acclaimed series of limited edition Blu-ray box sets dedicated to British cinema’s most iconic film production company. Also available on 23 July, Indicator presents Arthur Lubin’s Gothic thriller Footsteps in the Fog (1955).

“Close enough to kiss…or kill!”

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Baby Driver (2017, UK / USA)

Baby Driver (2017)

It’s becoming easy to recognise a film by Edgar Wright – there are trademark aspects: a sense of wit, sharp editing, and a rousing soundtrack. Baby Driver, Wright’s first-ever solo screenplay, offers a premise that is a cinematic convention, but told in a wholly energising and original way. The action-movie potential of the virtuoso driver is hardly a new concept. It’s a proposition that has had its twists and turns, from Walter Hill’s The Driver, The French Connection, Bullitt and Ronin right through to Ryan Gosling’s nameless specialist in Refn’s Drive.

“All you need is one killer track.”

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A Quiet Place (2018, USA)

A Quiet Place (2018)

John Krasinski, better known for his portrayal on The Office, has not previously tackled the horror genre; either as a director or as an actor. His directorial debut, Brief Interviews with Hideous Men (2009), and his second feature The Hollars (2016) were both comedic dramas that displayed Krasinski’s talent both in front of the camera and behind it. But Krasinski’s transition into horror is something special. Co-written by Scott Beck, Bryan Woods and John Krasinski, A Quiet Place is as much about parenthood, as it is about the otherworldly creatures that hunt exclusively by sound.

“If they hear you, they hunt you.”

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