FilmHorrorReviewsThriller

Defarious (2016, USA)

Defarious (2016)

Defarious is gorgeously shot, with a tinged-blue colour pallet reminiscent of 80’s retro horror, with hints of slasher genre thrown in. Pallante is able to build the atmosphere well with an easy on the eye leading lady – Janet Miranda (as Amy) – and a wonderfully large environment to broaden its scope. As Amy roams the house her visions manifest into a crazed killer or demon, which raises the questions of what’s reality and what’s only in her head. Overall Defarious hits a few marks. Not as unsettling as it thinks it is, but is a nice nod to the inspired classics of the 1980s.

“Fear is all in the mind.”

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It Came from the Desert (2017, Finland / UK / Canada)

It Came from the Desert (2017)

Marko Mäkilaakso’s movie It Came from the Desert evokes the creature features of the 1950s by way of the late 80s, making it a cheesy, nostalgia-packed thrill ride from start to finish. Inspired by the 1989 video game by Cinemaware, it never once takes itself too seriously, and keeps you watching with clever effects, over-the-top action sequences, and a number of hysterically funny lines that are sure to offend. What more could you ask from a monster movie?

“Okay, listen we need your help. We’re trapped by this giant ant… A giant freakin’ ant!”

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FilmHorrorReviewsSci-Fi

The Spawning (2017, UK)

The Spawning (2017, UK)

When an alien from another world crashes to earth via meteor and takes human form to hide in plain sight, it’s not rocket science to establish they’re not here to do any good. In fact all nastiness is planned as it’s on the hunt to impregnate a female to birth its own spawn!

The Spawning’s premise is simple enough, with clear influences of 70s & 80s British low budget sci-fi which I do have an affinity for, so I was so wanting The Spawning to succeed. Unfortunately what we get is a strained affair that may have played out better as a short.

“To save his race, he will devour yours.”

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FilmHorrorReviews

Bad Apples (2018, USA)

Bad Apples (2018, USA)

Craaaazy killers decked out in scary masks, wreaking havoc on Halloween night! Pretty spooky plot for a film right? Eeeeh, you’d think so wouldn’t you. All Hallows, and the anonymity it provides those with devious tendencies has been an informative and conducive background to some of our cherished seasonal classics. So, for the premise to be utilized once again comes as no real surprise. Unfortunately, neither does ANYTHING in Bryan Coyne’s Bad Apples, which strives for Carpenter charisma, but winds up leaving a bitter taste in your mouth.

“Rotten to the core.”

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ComedyDramaFilmReviews

Under the Tree (2017, Iceland)

Under the Tree (Undir trénu) (2017)

There’s an old saying about how you can choose your friends but you can’t choose your family. You also can’t generally choose your neighbors, and sometimes they can be even harder to avoid than family. It can be a real risk to try to befriend a neighbor, because if it all goes wrong somehow your only option is to pack up and move, and that’s a hassle nobody wants. Still, in Under the Tree, both sets of neighbors would have been much better off if they’d fled to opposite sides of the country. Admittedly Iceland isn’t a very big country, but that might have worked.

“Two families. One tree. A bloody mess.”

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DramaFilmReviews

American Animals (2018, UK / USA)

American Animals (2018, UK / USA)

At the outset of American Animals the words “This is not based on a true story,” appear onscreen, then three of those words disappear leaving the statement – “This is a true story.” Although American Animals is a heist film at its core, British documentarian Bart Layton, in an impressive feature debut, relies closely on a factual account of real events which took place in 2004. Intercut with the dramatization of the robbery played by actors, are interviews with the actual men who committed the crimes. This makes for an interesting and unusual combination of documentary and dramatic fiction.

“The perfect heist is a work of fiction.”

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The Mountain of the Cannibal God (1978, Italy) Shameless Blu-ray Review

The Mountain of the Cannibal God (1978, Italy) Shameless Blu-ray Review

The Mountain of the Cannibal God was originally released in United Kingdom under the name Prisoner of the Cannibal God, and added to the Director of Public Prosecutions (DPP) list of “video nasties” shortly after its home video release. Although The Mountain of the Cannibal God was one of the 33 “video nasties” not prosecuted under the Obscene Publications Act, it remained unavailable on home video until 2001.

“Why is everybody so scared of the Puka?”

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ComedyDramaFantasyFilmHorrorMusicReviews

Into the Unknown at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe: Kill the Beast, Famous Puppet Death Scenes and The Elvis Dead

Edinburgh Festival Fringe 2018

Rob Kemp presents The Elvis Dead

Edinburgh itself is a breathtaking city, but during August each year it becomes a hub for arts and culture. This year I wanted to write about my experience and review three of my personal highlights from the 2018 Edinburgh Festival Fringe. Each show is darkly humorous and worthy of your time if they make an appearance at next year’s Fringe, or perhaps elsewhere.

“If this isn’t what you were expecting – well, what were you expecting?”

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ExploitationFilmHorrorReviews

Slugs (1988, Spain / USA) Arrow Video Blu-ray Review

Slugs (1988, Spain / USA) Arrow Video Blu-ray Review

Arrow Video are quickly becoming heroes to horror fans that cut their teeth on the genre in the 80s. Regularly releasing the type of titles that you would be fascinated with in your local independent video shop, it gives those of us who excitedly gorged on the type of low budget horror these shops stocked a chance to re-watch them with modern eyes, and those too young to rent them a chance to finally get their hands on them.

“They ooze. They slime. They kill.”

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FilmHorrorReviewsThriller

Howling II …Your Sister Is a Werewolf (1985, UK / USA)

Howling II ...Your Sister Is a Werewolf (1985)

When you think back to the 80s, the true golden age of horror, there are certain films that define their sub-genre. I’m thinking of Fright Night and The Lost Boys defining the Vampire sub-genre. And the ones that (for me at least) defined Werewolf films are the likes of An American Werewolf in London and The Howling! One of the downsides from making a genre defining film though, is that there will invariably be a sequel (or sequels) that just can’t live up to the original’s quality. This has happened with Howling II …Your Sister Is a Werewolf.

“It’s not over yet.”

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Assault (1971, UK) Network Blu-ray Review

Assault (1971, UK) Network Blu-ray Review

Adapted from Kendal Young’s 1964 novel The Ravine, Sidney Hayers’ Assault is a vicious psychological thriller. Tessa Hurst, a 16-year-old pupil of the Heatherdene School for Girls in London, decides to take a shortcut home through the woods – through an area known as the Devil’s End. Unbeknownst to Tessa, she is being stalked by an unseen assailant who, upon making himself known, proceeds to chase her as she flees in terror. With nowhere to run Tessa is assaulted, partially stripped, and raped.

“If you go down in the woods today…”

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ComedyFilmHorrorReviews

Death Line (1972, UK / USA) Network Blu-ray Review

Death Line (1972, UK / USA) Network Blu-ray Review

After sleazily making his way to the London Underground from the sex district, James Manfred, OBE, some big shit… shot, at the Ministry of Defense, or something, confronts a woman waiting on the platform at Russell Square tube station. “How much?” he asks. “Look darling, god knows if you are worth it… but fortunately I can afford to find out.” Her response? A swift knee to his gonads before running away! As Manfred winces in pain, something catches his eye emerging from the underground tunnel…

“Mind the doors!”

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