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Win Bloody Muscle Body Builder in Hell on DVD from Terror Cotta

Bloody Muscle Body Builder in Hell on DVD in April 2017

Bloody Muscle Body Builder in Hell pays tribute to the enduring spirit of Sam Raimi’s Evil Dead series, and meshes the SFX style of Nobuhiko Obayashi’s cult horror Hausu (1977). Evil Dead and Asian horror fanatics, or anyone else with any interest in the splatter subgenre should own this movie!

Do you want to get your severed hands on this Japanese curiosity? Attack from Planet B and Terror Cotta have three copies of Bloody Muscle Body Builder in Hell available on DVD to giveaway.

Competition ends Sunday 1st October 2017

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The King (2017, South Korea)

The King (2017)

If you profess a love of cinema, but have been eschewing the excellent films coming out of Korea, you really have been missing out on some top-notch entertainment. I went into Han Jae-Rim’s movie The King, knowing only that it had been described as a political thriller. That covers about half of it – it’s also a satire about corruption within Korea’s legal system, it’s a gangster movie, it’s a revenge tale and yes, it’s a crime thriller too. If Wes Anderson decided to make ‘Goodfellas’ with Ben Wheatley, The King might just be the movie they’d have aspired to. Imagine that.

“Only one will become… The King.”

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Split (2016, USA)

Split (2016)

Split is a grindhouse film in disguise, particularly repulsive for the cavalier way it blames women for the degeneracy of McAvoy’s character.

What makes Split so frustrating is that it could have been Shyalaman’s best film. Visually the film is perfect and the sound strikes the right balance between serene and scary, much like a Hitchcock film. The tension is palpable in the psychiatrist’s scenes, and the gripping terror of the girls is captured perfectly as their predicament grows worse.

“An individual with multiple personalities can change their body chemistry with their thoughts.”

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It Comes at Night (2017, USA)

It Comes at Night (2017)

Deceptively titled and oddly mis-marketed as a horror movie, Trey Edward Shults’s second feature It Comes at Night, might much more appropriately be viewed as a ‘post-apocalyptic psychological family drama’.

I’m often loath to place a movie under a genre classification, because certain movies might straddle several genres and don’t easily fit into pigeonholes.

However, if you go to see It Comes at Night expecting a conventional horror film, you will be disappointed… or perhaps you’ll be surprised.

“You can’t trust anyone but family.”

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The Autopsy of Jane Doe (2016, UK / USA)

The Autopsy of Jane Doe (2016)

The concept of the ‘beautiful female corpse’ is by no means a new idea in the realm of gothic horror. In fact, it has been a stalwart of the genre since it began. Edgar Allan Poe was particularly partial to it and Bram Stoker took it to its natural conclusion when he hit upon the novel idea of having alluring dead ladies start walking about and seducing people.

Norwegian director André Øvredal follows up his found-footage indie sleeper Troll Hunter, with English-language debut The Autopsy of Jane Doe – a gory excursion through a dead woman’s innards.

“Every body has a secret.”

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What We Do in the Shadows (2014, New Zealand / USA)

What We Do in the Shadows (2014)

There have been hundreds of vampire films made worldwide and dozens of vampire comedies produced as well. However, none of them comes close to combining horror and humor effectively as What We Do in the Shadows.

What We Do in the Shadows has been highly praised by the mainstream press, and rightly so. Although not a cinematic masterpiece, this New Zealand gem has everything a fan could ask for- blood, guts, vampires, werewolves, zombies, and more laughs than any so-called comedy of the last decade.

“Some interviews with some Vampires.”

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Lords of the Cosmos #1

Lords of the Cosmos #1

UGLI Studios out of State College, Pennsylvania has broken into the world of science fiction with the debut issue of Lords of the Cosmos.

Created by Jason Lenox, Jason Palmatier and Dennis Fallon, this first issue in what will be an ongoing series is a remarkable homage to the comics and cartoons of the 1980s. It vividly depicts that age of conflict between noble heroes and loathsome villains, aided and abetted by their truly repulsive henchmen.

“CY-CORN. The last unicorn. Now more machine than beast. The great betrayer of his fellow magical creatures…”

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Xenomorphs Live! ALIEN: COVENANT and THEY LIVE Apparel Now Available from Fright-Rags

Alien: Covenant + They Live Fright-Rags Apparel

Fright-Rags have teamed up with the Colonial Marines at 20th Century Fox to release a collection of apparel for Ridley Scott’s Alien: Covenant; now in theaters nationwide.

They have also come here to chew bubblegum and kick ass with the release ofThey Live t-shirts… and they are all out of bubblegum.

“I have come here to chew bubblegum and kick ass… and I’m all out of bubblegum.”

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I Saw the Devil (2010, South Korea)

I Saw the Devil (2010)

The South Korean film industry has enjoyed a twenty year renaissance especially in the thriller/horror/gore genres. The release of Oldboy (2003) put South Korean cinema back on the map, after seeing its once glorious traditions wane for many years. I Saw the Devil is the penultimate representative of this new style of Korean cinema, with acting, cinematography, direction and production values equal to any of the world’s leading movie centers.

“Don’t act so weak… this is just the beginning. Remember… your nightmare’s only getting worse!”

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Swiss Army Man (2016, USA / Sweden)

Swiss Army Man (2016)

In Swiss Army Man, first-time directors Daniel Scheinert and Daniel Kwan (the Daniels) genuinely present you with things you’re unlikely to have seen before – and that, in the current cinematic climate, is a feat in itself.

One can certainly see why Swiss Army Man was a movie that was inevitably going to polarise opinions. In a time when moviegoers are subjected to a constant barrage of remakes, reboots or sequels, I for one am not going to turn my nose up at any movie which places almost all of its bets on being singular and unique.

“We all need some body to lean on.”

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Get Out (2017, USA)

Get Out (2017)

Get Out concerns Chris, who is invited by his girlfriend of five months, Rose to travel upstate for the weekend to meet her parents. Chris is concerned about how Rose’s privileged white family’s might react to him, as she hasn’t told them that her boyfriend is black. Meeting the parents is a frightening prospect at the best of times, but Get Out offers a vision of a black guy’s unnerving entrance into a particularly unorthodox white world.

Chris’s girlfriend brushes off his concerns, assuring him that her parents are liberals and that he has nothing to worry about…

“Just because you’re invited, doesn’t mean you’re welcome.”

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The Void (2016, Canada)

The Void (2016)

Canadian writer-director team Steven Kostanski and Jeremy Gillespie are part of the Astron-6 collective, whose work includes the playful retro horrors The Editor and Manborg.

In their feature The Void, they tone down the humour and opt for suspense and full-on Lovecraftian horror. They draw their influences from a number of sources, including Clive Barker’s Hellraiser, Anderson’s Event Horizon, Cronenberg’s The Fly, Lucio Fulci’s The Beyond and Carpenter’s The Thing and Prince of Darkness.

“There is a hell. This is worse.”

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