AdventureComedyDramaFilmHorrorThe TombThriller

JAWS and ELVIRA, MISTRESS OF THE DARK Merchandise from Fright-Rags

Fright-Rags' Jaws and Elvira Merchandise

You’re gonna need a bigger wardrobe with Fright-Rags’ ever-growing line of horror apparel. Before you head out to Amity Island, it’s time to expand your summer wardrobe with Jaws apparel. Then fall approaches… Evil. Terror. Lust. Some girls really know how to party, so be prepared for the Halloween season with Elvira, Mistress of the Dark tees.

“Unpleasant dreams…”

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Beyond Horror Design Trading Cards

Beyond Horror Design

Under the moniker of Beyond Horror Design, James Stewart has created these incredible, retro-stylised trading cards, based on exploitation cult classics such as The Beyond (1981).

“Woe be unto him who opens one of the seven gateways to Hell, because through that gateway, evil will invade the world.”

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ComedyExploitationFilmHorrorThe TombThriller

DAWN OF THE DEAD, HATCHET and HOUSE OF 1000 CORPSES Merchandise from Fright-Rags

Dawn of the Dead, Hatchet and House of 1000 Corpses Merch from Fright-Rags

Fright-Rags have released new merchandise relating to George A. Romero’s Dawn of the Dead, Adam Green’s Hatchet and Rob Zombie’s House of 1000 Corpses. So, when there’s no more room in your closet, the dead will truly walk the earth! There’s no turning back…

“When there’s no more room in hell, the dead will walk the earth.”

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Almost Human (1974, Italy) Shameless Blu-ray Review

Almost Human (1974) Shameless Blu-ray

Before Umberto Lenzi’s 1981 exploitation film Cannibal Ferox (aka Make Them Die Slowly) was “banned in 31 countries”, Almost Human had a reputation as a particularly nasty Italian crime thriller.

The late, great Tomas Milian (The Designated Victim) stars as the sadistic, criminal low life Giulio Sacchi, a man capable of rape, torture and murder.

“CAUTION: This picture may shock you, but it’s an experience in psychosadism you’ll never forget!”

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Truck Stop Women (1974, USA)

Truck Stop Women (1974)

This film was typical of the drive-in features Claudia Jennings appeared in the early 1970’s, with one notable exception. Although Truck Stop Women demonstrated what audiences would identify as the quintessential Claudia Jennings character, this was no working class, feminist hero Karen Walker from Unholy Rollers… In this film, Claudia commits about every original sin and violates a few new ones. She could easily be considered one of the screen’s best villains- a living nightmare, having no feelings for fellow human beings, and perhaps the sexiest sociopath of all time.

“No rig was too big for them to handle!”

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BooksDramaEroticaExploitationFilmSci-FiThe Tomb

Claudia Jennings: The Cult Icon Who Fell to Earth

Claudia Jennings

For Claudia, The Man Who Fell to Earth was a dream come true. She was working with a veteran, respected director on a major film. This is what she had been waiting for… While her role was unbilled and her screen time was very limited, her impact on the movie was much greater than her brief appearance would indicate.

“The tragedy of her death was quite shattering, but in a strange way perfection for the scene [in 1976’s The Man Who Fell to Earth] upon reflection.”

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Eraserhead (1977, USA)

Eraserhead (1977)

This [month] marks the 40th anniversary of David Lynch’s enigmatic cult film “Eraserhead”; a bizarrely strange and surreal body-horror film that is sure to get under your skin. In 1977, the film became a popular ‘Midnight Movie’ and has continued to bother viewers’ minds since then.

Every single scene is shot in stark black-and-white with constant industrial background ambience, which is sure to make the viewer feel on edge. Love it, or hate it, this movie will for sure leave an impression on you.

“Where your nightmares end…”

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Don’t Look in the Basement (1973, USA)

Don't Look in the Basement (1973)

Directed by S.F. Brownigg and released in 1973, Don’t Look in the Basement is an independent horror film that was unfortunate enough to fall foul of the UK media upon it’s 1981 home release; yet fortunate enough to not be prosecuted under the Obscene Publications Act in 1985.

For me, Don’t Look in the Basement was an impulse buy on home video, spurred on by the film’s cult status and history as a ‘video nasty’.

“The line between sanity and madness can be crossed in a single step. And with this step you enter the nightmare world of terror. On the day the insane took over the asylum!”

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Doc Savage: The Man of Bronze (1975, USA)

Doc Savage: The Man of Bronze (1975)

With Richard Donner’s Superman still a few years off from transforming comic cinema into a legit and lucrative genre, letting the audience in on the gag and addressing its protagonist’s more antiquated elements would have been a wise move. But outside of pausing every so often to superimpose a gleam across Ron Ely’s peepers or randomly announce a new, heretofore unknown talent of Doc’s, Doc Savage: The Man of Bronze does little to deconstruct its parent property or its contemporaries in the world of crime-fighting fiction. Producer George Pal took a chance on a big-screen throwback.

“Have no fear! Doc Savage is here!”

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Snuff (1976, Argentina / USA)

Snuff (1976)

One cannot discuss 1976’s most controversial theatrical release without first discussing the mythology of the ‘snuff’ film itself. You see, a snuff film is a filmed sequence that depicts the actual murder of another human being for distribution and financial exploitation. Morbid, yes?

Then came along Snuff: “The film that could only be made in South America…where life is cheap!”

The history behind Snuff however, is far more interesting than the film itself.

“Are the killings in this film real? You be the judge!”

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A Bay of Blood (1971, Italy)

A Bay of Blood (1971)

Originally released in 1971, A Bay of Blood was later refused certification from the BBFC in 1972, ensuring that the film could not be shown at any cinema within the United Kingdom. Fast forward to 1984, and the unmonitored home video market was beginning to find traction with consumers. Bava’s A Bay of Blood would finally find a UK audience upon it’s simultaneous release on VHS and Betamax (from Hokushin under the title Blood Bath) that same year.

“Diabolical! Fiendish! Savage… You may not walk away from this one!”

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Another 6 Essential Japanese VHS Covers

Cannibal Ferox (1981)

During the videotape format war of the late 1970s and early 1980s, JVC’s VHS would compete for market share against Sony’s Betamax. Betamax was, in theory, the superior recording format but VHS would ultimately emerge as the preeminent home video format in 1986. Consumers could not justify the extra cost of a Betamax VCR, which was often more expensive that the VHS equivalent due to the higher quality construction of Betamax recorders.

“Decadence is their fate.”

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