BooksDramaEroticaExploitationFilmSci-FiThe Tomb

Claudia Jennings: The Cult Icon Who Fell to Earth

Claudia Jennings: The Cult Icon Who Fell to Earth

For Claudia, The Man Who Fell to Earth was a dream come true. She was working with a veteran, respected director on a major film. This is what she had been waiting for… While her role was unbilled and her screen time was very limited, her impact on the movie was much greater than her brief appearance would indicate.

“The tragedy of her death was quite shattering, but in a strange way perfection for the scene [in 1976’s The Man Who Fell to Earth] upon reflection.”

PRESS PLAY ►

FantasyFilmHorrorReviews

Eraserhead (1977, USA)

Eraserhead (1977)

This [month] marks the 40th anniversary of David Lynch’s enigmatic cult film “Eraserhead”; a bizarrely strange and surreal body-horror film that is sure to get under your skin. In 1977, the film became a popular ‘Midnight Movie’ and has continued to bother viewers’ minds since then.

Every single scene is shot in stark black-and-white with constant industrial background ambience, which is sure to make the viewer feel on edge. Love it, or hate it, this movie will for sure leave an impression on you.

“Where your nightmares end…”

PRESS PLAY ►

ActionExploitationFilmThe TombThriller

ALMOST HUMAN will receive UK Blu-ray release courtesy of Shameless; your partners-in-crime

Almost Human (1974)

Umberto Lenzi’s mean-spirited 1974 poliziotteschi, Almost Human, is getting the high definition upgrade courtesy of your partners-in-crime; Shameless Screen Entertainment.

“CAUTION: This picture may shock you, but it’s an experience in psychosadism you’ll never forget!”

PRESS PLAY ►

FilmHorrorReviewsThriller

Don’t Look in the Basement (1973, USA)

Don't Look in the Basement (1973)

Directed by S.F. Brownigg and released in 1973, Don’t Look in the Basement is an independent horror film that was unfortunate enough to fall foul of the UK media upon it’s 1981 home release; yet fortunate enough to not be prosecuted under the Obscene Publications Act in 1985.

For me, Don’t Look in the Basement was an impulse buy on home video, spurred on by the film’s cult status and history as a ‘video nasty’.

“The line between sanity and madness can be crossed in a single step. And with this step you enter the nightmare world of terror. On the day the insane took over the asylum!”

PRESS PLAY ►

ActionAdventureComedyFantasyFilmReviews

Doc Savage: The Man of Bronze (1975, USA)

Doc Savage: The Man of Bronze (1975)

With Richard Donner’s Superman still a few years off from transforming comic cinema into a legit and lucrative genre, letting the audience in on the gag and addressing its protagonist’s more antiquated elements would have been a wise move. But outside of pausing every so often to superimpose a gleam across Ron Ely’s peepers or randomly announce a new, heretofore unknown talent of Doc’s, Doc Savage: The Man of Bronze does little to deconstruct its parent property or its contemporaries in the world of crime-fighting fiction. Producer George Pal took a chance on a big-screen throwback.

“Have no fear! Doc Savage is here!”

PRESS PLAY ►

EroticaExploitationFilmHorrorReviews

Snuff (1976, Argentina / USA)

Snuff (1976)

One cannot discuss 1976’s most controversial theatrical release without first discussing the mythology of the ‘snuff’ film itself. You see, a snuff film is a filmed sequence that depicts the actual murder of another human being for distribution and financial exploitation. Morbid, yes?

Then came along Snuff: “The film that could only be made in South America…where life is cheap!”

The history behind Snuff however, is far more interesting than the film itself.

“Are the killings in this film real? You be the judge!”

PRESS PLAY ►

FilmHorrorReviewsThriller

A Bay of Blood (1971, Italy)

A Bay of Blood (1971)

Originally released in 1971, A Bay of Blood was later refused certification from the BBFC in 1972, ensuring that the film could not be shown at any cinema within the United Kingdom. Fast forward to 1984, and the unmonitored home video market was beginning to find traction with consumers. Bava’s A Bay of Blood would finally find a UK audience upon it’s simultaneous release on VHS and Betamax (from Hokushin under the title Blood Bath) that same year.

“Diabolical! Fiendish! Savage… You may not walk away from this one!”

PRESS PLAY ►

ActionAdventureComedyEroticaExploitationFilmHorrorSci-Fi

Another 6 Essential Japanese VHS Covers

Cannibal Ferox (1981)

During the videotape format war of the late 1970s and early 1980s, JVC’s VHS would compete for market share against Sony’s Betamax. Betamax was, in theory, the superior recording format but VHS would ultimately emerge as the preeminent home video format in 1986. Consumers could not justify the extra cost of a Betamax VCR, which was often more expensive that the VHS equivalent due to the higher quality construction of Betamax recorders.

“Decadence is their fate.”

PRESS PLAY ►

ComedyFantasyFilmHorrorSci-Fi

Ringu and Hausu Japanese Horror Double Bill at Liverpool Small Cinema

Small Cinema Liverpool - Ringu + Hausu - Japanese Horror Double Bill

In the United Kingdom, Liverpool Small Cinema presents an iconic Japanese horror double bill: Hideo Nakata’s Ringu (1998) and Nobuhiko Obayashi’s Hausu (1977).

“To try and narrow down a selection of Japanese horror films, which cover all things psychological, supernatural, explicit and mythological, is no easy task however, so we felt that the programme would need to reflect the full scale of myths, folk and ghost tales that have dominated Japanese culture for centuries.”

PRESS PLAY ►

AnimationFilmTV

Japanese Animation: A Worldwide Culture

Devilman: The Birth (1987)Japanese anime has become a global worldwide culture for many reasons. Becoming popular in Japan after the second world war, anime provided an alternative format for storytelling. The common misconception in the west is that animation is primarily aimed towards the children, but this is not the case in Japan.

“For most Japanese consumers of anime, their culture is no longer a purely Japanese one (and indeed it probably hasn’t been for over a century and a half). At least in terms of entertainment, they are as equally interested by Western cultural influences as they are by specifically Japanese ones.”

PRESS PLAY ►

ActionComedyMartial Arts

Half a Loaf of Kung Fu (1978, Taiwan / Hong Kong)

The Lo Wei Motion Picture Company, particularly Lo Wei himself, was frustrated that their previous attempts to market Jackie Chan as the next Bruce Lee were not proving to be fruitful for the production house. As a result Lo Wei gave Jackie Chan a degree of creative control over 1978’s Half a Loaf of Kung Fu; a decision Lo Wei would initially regret.

“It’s my kung fu. It’s no good for anything, except laughs.” PRESS PLAY ►

FilmHorror

Carrie (1976, USA)

Carrie (1976)

Even as children, most of us have a perverse interest in the gruesome. This is not something new to modern culture, no matter how shocked we might be regarding the explicit nature of current video games and movies. Classic myths and fairy tales were tapping into human nature’s odd fascination with the macabre and grotesque since stories began. No contemporary writer has been more attuned to this strange proclivity than Stephen King, and the popularity of his work is a testament to his insight.

“You were warned never to push Carrie to the limits. Now you must face the evil consequences.”

PRESS PLAY ►